Under the guidance of Maja Hoffmann, the artistic programme for the LUMA Foundation in Arles has been developed by a “core group” of international advisers comprised of curators, museum directors and artists; Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno and Beatrix Ruf.

Since its inception in 2010, the artistic programme of the LUMA Foundation in Arles has commissioned and presented the work of numerous artists and thinkers privileging experimentation, innovation and collaboration with many of these artistic and intellectual relationships nurtured in Arles resonating throughout the globe. With collaboration at its core, the programme has included research, production, exhibition/presentation and archives, reflecting the three areas of interest to the LUMA Foundation; the arts, human rights and the environment.

Each project has been chosen to illustrate the future ambitions of the centre in Arles, the pre-construction phase serving as a testing ground.

Sous l’impulsion de Maja Hoffmann, le programme artistique de la Fondation LUMA à Arles a été développé par un « Core Group » de conseillers internationaux comprenant des commissaires, des directeurs de musées et des artistes ; Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno et Beatrix Ruf.

Depuis son lancement en 2010, la Fondation LUMA à Arles a commandité et présenté le travail de nombreux artistes et intellectuels en privilégiant l’expérimentation, l’innovation et la collaboration, les relations artistiques et intellectuelles développées à Arles faisant écho à des problématiques globales.

La collaboration étant au coeur des prérogatives de LUMA Arles, le programme s’est efforcé de développer des activités de recherche, de production, d’exposition, de présentation et d’archives, reflétant le trois axes de programmation de la Fondation LUMA que sont l’art, les droits de l’homme et l’environnement.

Annie Leibovitz Archive Project #1: The Early Years
Annie Leibovitz Archive Project #1 : The Early Years (Les Premières Années)
27 May – 24 September 2017
27 mai - 24 septembre 2017

Over the past six years, the LUMA Foundation has nurtured a series of ongoing collaborations with several artists, resulting in a Living Archive Program that integrates diverse forms of art, including photography, design, literature, film, and dance. The next step of this experimental and multidisciplinary program will make these resources available to the public in a manner intended by the artists. Open to students, scholars, artists, and visitors, LUMA’s Living Archive Program will be housed in a shared space located at the foundation’s Parc des Ateliers site in Arles, France, and will enable discovery, consultation, and research through a series of exhibitions, scholarly projects, and special events.

In anticipation of the completion of the building that will house this dynamic program, the LUMA Foundation is pleased to announce the acquisition and inaugural exhibition of the archives of legendary photographer Annie Leibovitz, who has created iconic portraits for nearly fifty years. Intended as the first of several major projects dedicated to the study and reinterpretation of the artist’s living archives, Annie Leibovitz Archive Project #1: The Early Years consists of over eight thousand photographs taken between 1968 and 1983, traces her development as a young artist, and follows her successes in the 1970s as she documented the culture that defined this pivotal era.

Image: Annie Leibovitz, photographs from the “driving” series. © Annie Leibovitz

Depuis six ans, la Fondation LUMA a mis en place un programme de collaboration avec de nombreux artistes vivants qui a donné naissance à un Programme d’Archives Vivantes pluridisciplinaire qui intègre toutes les formes d’art, parmi lesquelles la photographie, le design, la littérature, le cinéma et la danse. La prochaine étape de ce projet expérimental et pluridisciplinaire consistera à partager ces ressources vivantes, contemporaines et historiques avec le public. Ouvert aux étudiants, aux spécialistes, aux artistes et aux visiteurs, le Programme d’Archives Vivantes de LUMA permettra à chacun de découvrir et compulser ces archives dans le cadre d’expositions, projets académiques et évènements. Le Programme d’Archives Vivantes résidera dans un espace partagé, situé au Parc des Ateliers, d’Arles.

En amont de l’ouverture du nouveau bâtiment qui accueillera ce programme, la Fondation LUMA est heureuse d’annoncer l’acquisition et l’exposition inaugurale des archives de la mythique photographe Annie Leibovitz, qui réalise des portraits iconiques depuis près de cinquante ans. Conçu comme le premier d’une longue série de projets d’envergure consacrés à l’étude et à la réinterprétation des archives vivantes de l’artiste, Annie Leibovitz Archive Project #1: The Early Years rassemble huit mille photographies prises entre 1968 et 1983, retrace son parcours de jeune artiste, et revient sur le succès qu’elle a rencontré dans les années 1970 lorsqu’elle photographiait la culture propre à cette époque charnière.

Image: Annie Leibovitz, photos de la série “driving“ © Annie Leibovitz

Dates
Dates

27 May – 24 September 2017

27 mai - 24 septembre 2017

Venue
Lieu

Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers

Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers

PREV NEXT
programme
Programme
Installation view - Collier Schorr - Anne Collier. LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel RouxInstallation view - Collier Schorr - Anne Collier. LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux
Programme
Installation view – Zanele Mouholi. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux.Installation view – Zanele Mouholi. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux.
Programme
Installation view – Elad Lassry. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Victor Picon.Installation view – Elad Lassry. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Victor Picon.
Programme
Installation view. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux.Installation view. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux.
Programme
Installation view. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.Installation view. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.
Programme
Installation view – Zanele Mouholi. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux.Installation view – Zanele Mouholi. Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux.
Programme
Installation view - Collier Schorr- Anne Collier. LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel RouxInstallation view - Collier Schorr - Anne Collier. LUMA Foundation. Photo Lionel Roux
SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN?
SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN ?
4 July - 24 October 2016
4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016
New Forms for Contemporary Image Production
Nouvelles formes de production de l'image contemporaine
Curated by Walead Beshty, Elad Lassry, Zanele Muholi, and Collier Schorr. Exhibition architecture by Philippe Rahm.
Commissaires : Walead Beshty, Elad Lassry, Zanele Muholi et Collier Schorr. Architecture de l’exposition réalisée par Philippe Rahm.
. . .

Curated by Walead Beshty, Elad Lassry, Zanele Muholi, and Collier Schorr. Exhibition architecture by Philippe Rahm.

Produced by the LUMA Foundation, SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN? New Forms for Contemporary Image Production explores new structures for the presentation of the photographic image. An examination of the relationships between photography and its various modes of display, the exhibition draws upon avant-garde, political, and critically conscious legacies of aesthetic production, provides a new framework for experiencing the image as a reproduction, and prompts a structural rethinking of the photographic medium.
Acknowledging a rich history of the spatial and conceptual display of images in museums and other institutions, SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN? finds
precedent in a diverse set of exhibition practices, ranging from El Lissitzky’s photography-based installations of the late 1920s, to Edward Steichen’s The Family of Man — a collection of over five hundred photographs that toured the world for eight years after its initial exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1955. Prompted in part by the continued influence of these exhibitions on our current moment, the LUMA Arles Core Group established a competition process to consider the contemporary importance of exhibition display, and selected architect Philippe Rahm and four artists—Walead Beshty, Elad Lassry, Zanele Muholi, and Collier Schorr — to each develop a curatorial project within Rahm’s overall exhibition design. The responses that Beshty, Lassry, Muholi, and Schorr have produced reflect the ongoing and dynamic discourse surrounding the themes of contemporary image production and circulation, photographic and presentational convention.
The exhibition also marks the opening of La Mécanique Générale, a new exhibition venue in the Parc des Ateliers, renovated and expanded by
Selldorf Architects.

Picture Industry
Curated by Walead Beshty (b. 1976, lives and works in Los Angeles).
Picture Industry explores the circulation of images, and how modes of distribution shape the way that a picture is produced, reproduced, and
received. A collection of photographs, slide projections, periodicals, recent film and video installations, sculptures, and works on paper that date from the 1880s to the present, Beshty’s exhibition investigates how an image’s meaning is derived from both the means of its distribution,
and the material form that it assumes.

Untitled
Curated by Elad Lassry (b. 1977, lives and works in Los Angeles).
A series of color photographs depicting anonymous dental procedures, Lassry’s untitled project examines how medical imagery’s visual qualities
shift depending on their context. A reminder that clinical photography has historically been limited by the same optical principles required to take any picture—one must illuminate the contours of the body, in order to gaze inside its cavities—Lassry’s images suggest that the utilitarian function of clinical images is built into the dormant capacity of all photographs, and that the themes of technology and advancing life have always been central to the photographic medium.

Somnyama Ngonyama
Curated by Zanele Muholi (b. 1972; lives and works in Johannesburg).
Drawn from a Zulu phrase meaning “Hail, the Dark Lioness,” Somnyama Ngonyama uses stylized self-portraiture as a means to commemorate,
question, and celebrate the ways the black body has been represented in photography. Augmented with shells, textiles, and other objects, the
artist’s diverse coiffures explore hair as symbolic primary material and a central facet of African identity and stylistic expression. An acknowledgement of South Africa’s political history and a series of activist networks operating today in the country and elsewhere, Muholi’s project comments on aesthetic and cultural issues that affect black people, and specifically black women, in Africa and its diaspora.

Shutters, Frames, Collections, Repetition
Curated by Collier Schorr (b. 1963, lives and works in New York).
A collaborative dialogue between Schorr and fellow photographer Anne Collier, Shutters, Frames, Collections, Repetition consists of nudes and
studies whose subjects often pose with, or are otherwise framed by, the technologies and accessories of commercial and amateur photography.
A stylized collection of close-ups and portraits, the project includes several images of women holding cameras as props or posing naked
next to telephoto lenses. Throughout, Schorr and Collier re-imagine what looking—and looking back—might resemble, suggesting a new dialogue
between the nude and the camera.

Luminance
Exhibition Concept by Philippe Rahm (b. 1967, lives and works in Paris).
Philippe Rahm’s exhibition concept balances the nineteenth century industrial vocabulary of the Mécanique Générale with its newer architectural features, designed by Selldorf Architects. Using reflective or absorptive materials to modify light, Luminance alludes to a natural landscape: brightly lit areas conjure the summer tropics, slightly darker ones resemble mild springtime climes, and shadow-filled regions are likened to polar winters. Throughout the exhibition, artworks are organically arranged within these luminous variations—videos play in darkened regions; older photographs are protected from excess light in slightly lighter areas; and installations and contemporary photographic prints are found in brighter areas.

SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN? New Forms for Contemporary Image Production is conceived by the LUMA Arles Core Group: Maja Hoffmann, Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno, and Beatrix Ruf. Commissioned and produced by the LUMA Foundation for LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers in Arles, France. The exhibition is part of the international photography festival Les Rencontres d’Arles 2016.

Commissaires : Walead Beshty, Elad Lassry, Zanele Muholi et Collier Schorr.
Architecture de l’exposition réalisée par Philippe Rahm.

Réalisée par la Fondation LUMA, l’exposition « SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN ? Nouvelles formes de production de l’image contemporaine » examine les
nouvelles structures dédiées à la présentation de l’image photographique. Analysant les rapports entre la photographie et ses différents modes de présentation, l’exposition puise dans les pensées avant-gardiste, politique et critique de la production esthétique. Elle offre un cadre inédit à l’expérience de l’image comme reproduction et suscite une nouvelle approche structurelle du medium photographique.
Reprenant à son compte la longue histoire de la présentation théorique et spatiale des images par les musées et autres institutions,
« SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN ? » renvoie à différentes pratiques d’exposition, depuis les installations photographiques d’El Lissitzky à la fin des
années 1920 jusqu’à « The Family of Man » d’Edward Steichen qui réunit plus de 500 clichés et tourna dans le monde pendant huit années après
sa première présentation en 1955 au Museum of Modern Art de New York. Constatant l’influence toujours vive de ces manifestations, le Core
Group de LUMA Arles a mis en place un appel à candidatures afin d’étudier l’importance de la présentation des expositions contemporaines et a ainsi sélectionné Philippe Rahm et quatre artistes, Walead Beshty, Elad Lassry, Zanele Muholi et Collier Schorr, afin que chacun propose un projet curatorial au sein de la scénographie de Philippe Rahm. Leurs propositions reflètent le dynamisme des réflexions actuelles sur la production et la diffusion des images et sur les conventions de la photographie et de ses présentations.
Cette exposition marque également l’ouverture de La Mécanique Générale, un nouvel espace d’exposition au Parc des Ateliers, rénové et
agrandi par Selldorf Architects.

Picture Industry
Commissaire : Walead Beshty (né en 1976, vit et travaille à Los Angeles).
« Picture Industry » examine la manière dont les images ont été diffusées depuis l’apparition de la photographie au 19ème siècle et comment ces
modes de diffusion continuent de façonner la production, la reproduction et la réception de ces images. Au travers d’une série de photographies, de projections de diapositives, de journaux, de films et d’installations vidéo, de sculptures et de divers travaux sur papier datant des années 1880 à nos jours, l’exposition de Walead Beshty montre que le sens d’une image dérive tout autant de son type de diffusion que de la forme matérielle qu’elle épouse.

Untitled
Commissaire : Elad Lassry (né en 1977, vit et travaille à Los Angeles).
L’exposition d’Elad Lassry, composée de clichés d’interventions dentaires et de très gros plans de dents et de gencives, cherche à examiner comment les qualités visuelles de l’imagerie médicale évoluent en fonction de leur contexte. Historiquement, la photographie clinique a été limitée aux mêmes principes optiques que pour n’importe quelle photographie : il est impossible d’examiner le corps sans en éclairer les contours et les cavités.
Elad Lassry suggère ainsi que les images utilitaires illustrent la capacité qui sommeille en toute photographie et témoignent du fait que la photographie a toujours été liée à la technologie et aux progrès au bénéfice de la vie humaine.

Somnyama Ngonyama
Commissaire : Zanele Muholi (née en 1972 ; vit et travaille à Johannesburg).
Dans « Somnyama Ngonyama », dont le titre est tiré d’une phrase zouloue signifiant « Salut à toi, lionne noire », Zanele Muholi a recours à l’autoportrait pour commémorer, questionner et célébrer la façon dont le corps noir a été représenté en photographie. Enrichies de coquillages, de tissus et de matériaux divers, les coiffures de l’artiste soulignent l’importance symbolique de la chevelure, une facette centrale de l’identité africaine et de son expression stylistique. En s’appuyant sur plusieurs faits marquants de l’Histoire contemporaine de l’Afrique du Sud et de mouvements activistes qui agissent dans le pays et ailleurs, l’artiste commente les problématiques politiques et culturelles qui touchent les personnes de race noire et, plus précisément, les femmes noires en Afrique et dans ses diasporas.

Shutters, Frames, Collections, Repetition
Commissaire : Collier Schorr (née en 1963, vit et travaille à New York).
Dialogue collaboratif entre les photographes Collier Schorr et Anne Collier, l’exposition « Shutters, Frames, Collections, Repetition » se compose de nus et d’études dont le sujet est généralement encadré par le format technique ou commercial de la photographie amateur. L’exposition comprend des gros plans et des portraits, notamment plusieurs photographies de femmes tenant un appareil photo comme s’il s’agissait d’un accessoire ou bien posant nues près d’un appareil. Ainsi, Collier Schorr et Anne Collier ré-imaginent ce que c’est que de regarder et d’être regardé en soulignant un nouveau dialogue possible entre le nu et l’appareil photo.

Luminance
Scénographie : Philippe Rahm (né en 1967, vit et travaille à Paris).
Le concept développé par Philippe Rahm a été retenu pour l’équilibre proposé entre le vocabulaire structurel de l’architecture industrielle
du 19ème siècle de la Mécanique Générale et les nouveaux éléments architecturaux conçus par Selldorf Architects.
« Luminance » se propose de travailler sur les valeurs d’intensité lumineuse émises et réfléchies, faisant ainsi écho à un paysage naturel :
les zones les plus vivement éclairées évoquent l’été des tropiques, celles plus sombres le printemps des climats tempérés, celles plongées dans
l’ombre les hivers polaires. Les oeuvres d’art trouveront naturellement leur place au sein de ces variations lumineuses : les vidéos dans l’obscurité, les clichés anciens et photosensibles dans les régions un peu plus claires, les installations ou les tirages photographiques contemporains dans les parties les plus éclairées.

« SYSTEMATICALLY OPEN ? Nouvelles formes de production de l’image contemporaine » a été conçue et développée par le Core Group de LUMA Arles, Maja Hoffmann : Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno et Beatrix Ruf. Exposition organisée et produite par la Fondation LUMA pour LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers d’Arles, France. Cette exposition s’inscrit dans le cadre du festival international de photographie Les Rencontres d’Arles 2016.

Dates
Dates

4 July - 24 October 2016

4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016

Venue
Lieu

The Mécanique, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

La Mécanique, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Jordan Wolfson - Colored Sculpture
Jordan Wolfson - Colored Sculpture
1 - 24 October 2016
1 - 24 octobre 2016
An installation from the Maja Hoffmann / LUMA Foundation collection
Une installation issue de la collection de Maja Hoffmann / Fondation LUMA
. . .

An installation from the Maja Hoffmann / LUMA Foundation collection

Based in Los Angeles and New York, Jordan Wolfson (b. 1980) is known for his thought-provoking works in a wide range of media, including video,
sculpture, installation, photography, and performance. Pulling intuitively from the world of advertising, the internet, and the technology industry,he produces ambitious and enigmatic narratives that frequently revolve around a series of invented, animated characters.

The red hair, freckles, and boyish look of Colored Sculpture draw associations to a number of literary and pop cultural characters, ranging
from Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, the children’s television puppet icon Howdy Doody, and Alfred E. Neuman, the mascot of Mad magazine.
Highly polished in appearance, the work is suspended with heavy chains from a large mechanized gantry, which is programmed to choreograph its
movements. The sheer physicality of the installation includes the work being hoisted and thrown forcefully to the ground, viscerally blurs the distinction between figuration and abstraction, while furthering the formal and narrative possibilities of sculpture.

The sculpture’s eyes employ facial recognition technology to track spectators’ gazes and movements, thereby adding another layer of interactive corporeality to the work. Using fiber optics, its eyes also intermittently display a range of imagery and video footage, including the
artist’s own animations and filmed footage, and other found visual material, all of which seem to mine the subconscious preoccupations and desires of our society and consumer culture.

The work’s incongruous accompanying soundtrack further underscores the complex tensions and distortions that the artist establishes between
reality and artificiality, subject and object, meaning and sense.

Une installation issue de la collection de Maja Hoffmann / Fondation LUMA

Vivant entre Los Angeles et New York, Jordan Wolfson (né en 1980) est connu pour ses oeuvres virulentes qui font appel à une vaste palette de
moyens d’expression, vidéo, sculpture, installation, photo, performance, … Puisant intuitivement dans l’univers de la publicité, d’Internet
et des nouvelles technologies, il produit des récits ambitieux et énigmatiques souvent centrés sur des personnages de fiction animés.

Les cheveux roux, les taches de rousseur et l’allure gavroche de « Colored Sculpture » évoquent des personnages littéraires ou de la culture
populaire américaine tels que Huckleberry Finn, Howdy Doody et Alfred E. Neuman, la mascotte du magazine Mad. Très soignée en apparence, la
statue est suspendue par de lourdes chaînes à un grand portique équipé de moteurs programmés pour chorégraphier ses mouvements. L’installation a une présence matérielle puissante : la figure du jeune garçon est alternativement soulevée grâce aux chaînes puis violemment jetée au sol. La frontière entre figuration et abstraction se brouille en même temps que le potentiel narratif et formel de la sculpture s’élargit.

Les yeux de la statue sont équipés d’un système de reconnaissance des visages qui lui permet de suivre le regard et les mouvements des visiteurs, ajoutant ainsi une interaction physique avec l’oeuvre. Grâce à la fibre optique, ces mêmes yeux projettent par intermittence des images et des vidéos, réalisées par l’artiste ou tirées d’autres sources, qui toutes semblent sonder les préoccupations et les désirs inconscients de notre société de consommation.

La bande-son sans rapport évident avec l’installation souligne les tensions et les distorsions que l’artiste établit entre la réalité et l’artifice, le sujet et l’objet, la signification et le sens.

Dates
Dates

1 - 24 October 2016

1 - 24 octobre 2016

Opening hours
Horaires

Thurs – Sun, 11.00 – 19.00

Du jeudi au dimanche, 11h – 19h

Venue
Lieu

Workshop, La Mécanique Générale, Parc des Ateliers

Workshop, La Mécanique Générale, Parc des Ateliers

Admission
Billets d’entrée

(Systematically Open & Jordan Wolfson)
Adult: 9€
Concession: 7€
Free entry: under-18s, RSA & ASS, Arles’ citizens and disabled person

Combined ticket (LUMA Arles & Fondation Vincent Van Gogh Arles): 12 €
(available until 24 October 2016)

(Systematically Open & Jordan Wolfson)
Tarif plein : 9 €
Tarif réduit : 7 €
Gratuité: Jeunes de moins de 18 ans, personnes à mobilité réduite, bénéficiaires de l’AAH, RSA, ASS ou ASPA, Arlésiens

Billet couplé Fondation Vincent Van Gogh Arles : 12 €
(le billet Fondation Vincent Van Gogh Arles est valable jusqu’au 24 Octobre 2016)

In Conversation
En Conversation

Urs Fischer & Jordan Wolfson
30 September 2016 – 03.30 PM
La Mécanique Générale, Parc des Ateliers

Urs Fischer & Jordan Wolfson
30 septembre 2016 – 15H30
La Mécanique Générale, Parc des Ateliers

William Kentridge - More Sweetly Play the Dance
William Kentridge - More Sweetly Play the Dance
4 July - 24 October 2016
4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016
An installation from the Maja Hoffmann / LUMA Foundation collection
Une installation issue de la collection de Maja Hoffmann / Fondation LUMA
. . .

An installation from the Maja Hoffmann / LUMA Foundation collection

Over the last three decades, South African artist William Kentridge (b. 1955) has achieved worldwide fame for his large, poetic, and incisive
installations, which he has developed by combining different types of media: film, animation, drawing, music, and theatre. Typical of his artistic practice are his charcoal drawings and paper collages, which he photographs sequentially and transforms into animated films. Kentridge’s experiences in South Africa, both during and after apartheid, have profoundly shaped his work, which often explores the historically charged past of his native country through poetic and expressive imagery.

More Sweetly Play the Dance (2015) is a multiscreen installation depicting a caravan procession that stretches from floor to ceiling, forty meters in length. It encircles the viewer, depicting a dancing column of animated drawings and videos of dancers who, led by a brass band, enact
a Danse Macabre: sickly figures are supported by IV drips, priests move almost jauntily while carrying funeral flowers, and columns of people
march forward while dragging sacks and dead bodies.

The work evokes long-standing associations with religious processions and cheerful parades. But the motif of the procession also alludes to the
flow and passage of refugees—signifying a universal symbol for movement and motion, various political processes and activism, and more generally, the course of history.

Une installation issue de la collection de Maja Hoffmann / Fondation LUMA

Au cours des trente dernières années, l’artiste sud-africain William Kentridge (né en 1955), a acquis une reconnaissance mondiale grâce à ses
grandes installations poétiques et critiques, qu’il développe au travers de plusieurs médias : film, animation, dessin, musique et théâtre. Les dessins au fusain et collages qu’il photographie en séquence et transforme en images animées sont caractéristiques de son oeuvre. L’expérience sudafricaine de William Kentridge, pendant et après l’apartheid, inspire profondément son travail, qui explore le lourd passé de son pays natal au travers d’images poétiques et expressives.

« More Sweetly Play the Dance » est une procession qui se déroule sur plusieurs écrans allant du sol au plafond et s’étirant sur 40 m. L’installation enveloppe le spectateur. Elle montre une caravane de dessins qui s’animent et de danseurs filmés composant différentes figures d’une danse macabre. Des malades avancent lentement, appuyés sur leur pied à perfusion ; des prêtres se déplacent presque gaiement en portant des couronnes mortuaires ; des colonnes de personnages défilent, traînant des sacs ou des cadavres. Toute la procession est menée par une fanfare.

L’oeuvre évoque à la fois un cortège religieux, un joyeux défilé, un flux de réfugiés. Le motif de la procession devient ainsi le symbole du mouvement, du processus politique, de l’activisme et du cours de l’histoire.

Dates
Dates

4 July - 24 October 2016

4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016

Venue
Lieu

La Formation, Parc des Ateliers

La Formation, Parc des Ateliers

Opening hours
Horaires

Thursday – Sunday, 11am – 7pm

Du jeudi au dimanche, 11h à 19h00

Admission
Tarif

Free entry

Entrée libre

Atelier LUMA Arles
Atelier LUMA Arles
4 July - 24 October 2016
4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016

In March 2016, the LUMA Foundation launched Atelier LUMA Arles, a design and production workshop based at the Parc des Ateliers. Drawing on local resources, materials, know-how and talent of Arles and beyond, Atelier LUMA Arles is rapidly becoming a place where knowledge is shared
and exchanged. This experimental platform aims to create the conditions for fruitful research as well as the development of new projects, products, opportunities and solutions to problems and questions the Parc des Ateliers, the city of Arles and the Camargue are facing.

Atelier LUMA Arles’ first mission, initiated in Autumn 2015 and to be continued in summer 2016, consists of mapping the local biotope to use
it as a resource for this production workshop. The experimental work of the Atelier LUMA program will create new directions for artistic research, and engagement with social design, the environment, education and community, aligning preservation with innovation. The project is also a generator for ideas and activities to initiate partnerships and business opportunities of a different kind.

Through Atelier LUMA Arles, the LUMA Foundation is creating a research and production tool that will help anticipate and prepare the organization of the social innovation forum “IdeasCity”—founded by the New Museum in New York—that will take place in Arles, at the Parc des
Ateliers, in May 2017. IdeasCity is a discovery, exchange and collaborative platform taking place in cities that are looking for ways to re-invent themselves and make themselves heard. In partnership with the LUMA Foundation, the first edition of this series of events took place in Detroit (USA) in April 2016. Another edition will follow in Athens (Greece) in September 2016 and in Arles in Spring 2017. A major presentation of this research program will be organized in New York in Autumn 2017.

This summer, the first productions of Atelier LUMA Arles, developed by the students of the Masters in Social Design Department of the Design
Academy Eindhoven (NL), under the guidance of Jan Boelen, Head of the Masters in Social Design Department, will be presented at La Formation,
at the Parc des Ateliers, in Arles.

En mars 2016, la Fondation LUMA a lancé Atelier LUMA Arles, un atelier de production et de design implanté sur le site du Parc des Ateliers. Prenant appui sur les ressources et richesses en matière première, savoirs- faires et talents d’Arles et des environs, Atelier LUMA Arles devient peu à peu, un lieu d’échange et de partage des savoirs. Cette plateforme expérimentale et collaborative a pour objectif de créer les conditions d’une recherche fructueuse et faire naître des projets, des produits, des opportunités ou des solutions à des problématiques, questions ou sujets auxquels le site du Parc des Ateliers, la ville d’Arles, ou la Camargue sont confrontés.

Une première mission d’Atelier LUMA Arles initiée en automne 2015 et qui se poursuivra en été 2016, consiste à référencer le biotope qui servira
de ressource pour cet atelier de production. Ce travail expérimental permettra de favoriser l’émergence de nouveaux projets dans le domaine
du design social, de l’environnement, de l’ éducation, du développement local, conjuguant ainsi préservation et innovation. Plateforme de rencontre et de fabrication, Atelier LUMA Arles se veut générateur d’idées et d’activités qui donneront lieu à des partenariats et des opportunités d’une nouvelle nature.

À travers Atelier LUMA Arles La Fondation LUMA se dote ainsi d’un outil de recherche et de production qui permet d’anticiper et préparer la
venue du forum d’innovation sociale « IdeasCity » – développé par le New Museum de New York – qui aura lieu à Arles, au Parc des Ateliers en mai
2017. Forum de découvertes, d’échanges et de rencontres, IdeasCity se déroule dans des villes qui cherchent à se réinventer et faire entendre leur voix. En partenariat avec la Fondation LUMA, la première édition de cette série s’est tenue à Detroit (Etats-Unis) en Avril 2016, suivra Athènes (Grèce) en Septembre 2016 avant d’être organisé à Arles au printemps 2017. Une grande restitution de cette recherche est programmée à New York en automne 2017.

Cet été, les premiers travaux d’Atelier LUMA Arles développés par les étudiants de l’Ecole de Design d’Eindhoven, sous la direction de Jan
Boelen, directeur du programme de design social, seront présentés à La Formation, au Parc des Ateliers d’Arles.

Dates
Dates

4 July - 24 October 2016

4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016

Venue
Lieu

La Formation, Parc des Ateliers

La Formation, Parc des Ateliers

Opening hours
Horaires

Thursday – Sunday, 11am – 7pm

Du jeudi au dimanche, 11h à 19h00

Admission
Tarif

Free entry

Entrée libre

PREV NEXT
programme
Programme
Courtesy Offprint & LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.Courtesy Offprint & LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.
Programme
Courtesy Offprint & LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.Courtesy Offprint & LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.
Offprint Library Arles
Offprint Library Arles
27 June – 24 October 2016
Du 27 juin au 24 octobre 2016

Offprint is a forum gathering independent publishers in numerous locations, including the École des Beaux Arts in Paris (November 2016)
and Tate Modern in London (May 2017). It features publications on art, photography, design, architecture, experimental music, open culture and
activism. Focusing on discerning practices in these fields, we aim to offer members of these communities a context in which they can maintain
their integrity, their critical voice and their social role.

From 27 June until 25 September, as part of the LUMA Foundation’s summer program in Arles, Offprint Library will present art publications
on photography, image making and new technology at the Garage of the Cloître Hotel. One hundred publications have been carefully selected to
stimulate a critical approach and to reinforce the consideration of political, environmental, and social issues in the production of our contemporary visual culture.

Featured publications include those by: Artie Vierkant, Travess Smalley, Claude Closky, Thomas Bayrle, Dana Lixenberg, Alexandra Leykauf, Lisa
Oppenheim, Geert Goiris, Camille Henrot, Melanie Bonajo, Austin Lee, Keren Cytter & Nora Schultz, Lilit Azoulay, Mohamed Bourrouissa, Cameron Jamie, Wade Guyton, Walead Beshty, David Hockney, Mishka Henner, Jodi, Jon Rafman, Avery Singer, Roe Etheridge, Laurence Aetgerter, Shirana Shabazi, Rob Pruitt, Robert Heineken, Tiane Doan Na Champassak, Paul Kooiker, Kenta Kobayashi, Daisuke Yokota, Joe Hamilton, Thomas Mailander, Rafael Rozendaal, and Paul Soulellis.

Publications can be purchased online at offprintlibrary.com directly from the Offprint publishers—and at the Garage of the Cloître Hotel in Arles from 27 June until 25 September 2016.

Offprint est un salon et forum qui réunit des éditeurs indépendants à l’occasion notamment, de deux rendez-vous internationaux d’envergure :
Offprint Paris à l’École des Beaux-Arts de Paris (novembre 2016) et Offprint London à la Tate Modern de Londres (mai 2017). Des publications liées aux domaines de l’art, de la photographie, du design, de l’architecture, de la musique expérimentale et des cultures critiques et engagées sont ainsi proposées à la découverte d’un public curieux et en quête de voix nouvelles et alternatives.

À Arles, d’où Offprint rayonne désormais, Offprint Library présentera des publications traitant de la photographie, de la création d’images et des nouvelles technologies, au Garage de l’Hôtel du Cloître du 27 juin au 25 septembre. Inscrite dans le cadre des activités que propose la Fondation LUMA à Arles, une centaine de publications ont été sélectionnées avec soin pour stimuler l’esprit critique, nourrir les considérations
politiques, environnementales et sociales qui animent notre culture visuelle contemporaine.

Les publications des artistes suivants seront présentées (non exhaustif): Artie Vierkant, Travess Smalley, Claude Closky, Thomas Bayrle, Dana
Lixenberg, Alexandra Leykauf, Lisa Oppenheim, Geert Goiris, Camille Henrot, Melanie Bonajo, Austin Lee, Keren Cytter & Nora Schultz, Lilit
Azoulay, Mohamed Bourrouissa, Cameron Jamie, Wade Guyton, Walead Beshty, David Hockney, Mishka Henner, Jodi, Jon Rafman, Avery Singer,
Roe Etheridge, Laurence Aetgerter, Shirana Shabazi, Rob Pruitt, Robert Heineken, Tiane Doan Na Champassak, Paul Kooiker, Kenta Kobayashi,
Daisuke Yokota, Joe Hamilton, Thomas Mailander, Rafael Rozendaal, Paul Soulellis.

Ces publications peuvent être achetées directement aux éditeurs d’Offprint sur offprintlibrary.com et au Garage de l’Hôtel du Cloître à Arles, du 27 juin au 25 septembre 2016.

Dates
Dates

27 June – 24 October 2016

Du 27 juin au 24 octobre 2016

Opening times
Horaires

Open daily 2pm – 8pm

Ouvert tous les jours de 14h à 20h

Venue
Lieu

Garage de l’Hôtel du Cloître, 14 rue du Cloître, Arles

Garage de l’Hôtel du Cloître, 14 rue du Cloître, Arles

Admission
Tarif

Free entry

Entrée gratuite

La Cuisine des Forges
La Cuisine des Forges
4 July - 24 October 2016
4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016

La Cuisine des Forges is a dynamic culinary program dedicated to the broader issues of cultural diversity and sustainability that are central
to the greater mission of the LUMA Foundation. An expression of the conviviality and diverse cultural heritage of the Arlesian and Camargue
regions, La Cuisine des Forges is directly inspired by its southern Mediterranean surroundings, and is motivated by the belief that cooking is a
universal way of sharing and promoting interpersonal and cross-cultural exchange.

This summer, La Cuisine des Forges will invite women from Provence, Morocco, Spain, Lebanon, and Senegal to prepare family recipes—meals
which are typically created and enjoyed in intimate settings. Working together with a team of professionals, these women will welcome the
public each day and serve meals inspired by their rich culinary traditions. In presenting authentic dishes of exceptional quality and flavor, La Cuisine des Forges celebrates both the artisanal skills of the individual and the community-based bonds of shared cultural knowledge.

La Cuisine des Forges is produced by LUMA Arles with the support and consultation of Armand Arnal (head chef of the restaurant La Chassagnette);
Kamal Mouzawak, a Lebanese social innovator who created Souk el-Tayeb, a farmers’ market in Beirut; and Afrique en vie, an Arles-based culinary project dedicated to promoting sustainable development in Senegal, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, and Comoros.

La Cuisine des Forges est un projet culturel dynamique qui reflète les préoccupations de la Fondation LUMA pour les questions de diversité et
de développement durable. La Cuisine des Forges sera sous l’influence de la Méditerranée et du grand Sud. C’est avec la conviction que la cuisine est un lien universel de partage, de mixité et d’échange qu’a germée l’idée de proposer dans notre patio des Forges une cuisine qui reflète toutes les composantes de la population arlésienne et camarguaise.

« Des Mamans » provençales, marocaines, espagnoles, libanaises ou sénégalaises, entourées par des professionnels, accueilleront le public du
Parc des Ateliers, chaque jour de l’été, avec un plat unique issu de l’une des traditions culinaires représentées. Moment de découverte réciproque, la Cuisine des Forges sera le reflet d’une identité arlésienne et d’un territoire, mais aussi de parcours individuels incarnés par la qualité, la saveur et l’authenticité des mets qui seront proposés.

La Cuisine des Forges est produite par LUMA Arles avec le soutien et les conseils d’Armand Arnal (Chef du restaurant La Chassagnette) et Kamal Mouzawak, un innovateur social d’origine libanaise, fondateur de Souk el-Tayeb, a un marché paysan à Beyrouth et Afrique en vie, un projet culinaire basé à Arles qui cherche à favoriser le développement durable du Sénégal, du Bénin, du Burkina Faso, du Cameroun et des Comores.

Dates
Dates

4 July - 24 October 2016

4 juillet - 24 octobre 2016

Opening times
Horaires

Thursday – Sunday, 11.00 – 19.00;
lunch served from 12.00 – 15.00

Du jeudi au dimanche, 11h00 à 19h00 ;
Déjeuner de 12h00 à 15h00

Venue
Lieu

Les Forges courtyard

La cour des Forges, Parc des Ateliers

PREV NEXT
programme
Programme
Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Clément Vayssière.Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Clément Vayssière.
Programme
Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.
Programme
Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.Courtesy LUMA Foundation. Photo Michael Alberry.
L.A. Dance Project
L.A. Dance Project
22, 23, 24 September 2016
22, 23, 24 septembre 2016

The LUMA Foundation is excited to announce a new partnership with L.A. Dance Project for the next three years. The building ‘La Formation’ in the Parc des Ateliers will be dedicated to Performing Arts Residencies, which will feature rehearsal studio space, therapy rooms, accommodation and living quarters.

L.A. Dance Project’s mission is to create new work and to revive groundbreaking collaborations from influential dance makers, both in the theater and in non-traditional environments. New works by the company are multidisciplinary collaborations across artistic disciplines, and include visual artists, musicians, designers, directors and composers. Since its founding, the company has toured and given master classes at international venues and festivals including the Holland Festival, the Edinburgh International Festival, La Maison de la Danse, the Saitama Arts Center, Sadler’s Wells Theatre, Shanghai and Bejing Opera House and Theatre du Châtelet.
In the US, the company has performed at venues including Jacob’s Pillow, Brooklyn Academy of Music and New York City Center. The company’s studios are housed in the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Downtown L.A., and the company has performed in L.A. at The Music Center’s Walt Disney Music Hall, MOCA, Union Station, The Theatre at Ace Hotel, and The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.

7 – 13 July & 22 – 24 September 2016
La Mécanique Générale

In this programme, Benjamin Millepied presents his widely acclaimed Hearts & Arrows, set to the music of Philip Glass and a visual concept by Liam Gillick.

Helix
Choreography: Justin Peck
Music: Esa-Pekka Salonen
Costumes: Janie Taylor

MinEvent
Music: John Cage
Choreography: Merce Cunningham
Costumes: Banu Ogan
Dancers: Stephanie Amurao, Anthony Bryant, Aaron Carr, Julia Eichten, Morgan Lugo, Nathan Makolandra, Robbie Moore, Rachelle Rafailedes, Lilja Rúriksdóttir

Hearts & Arrows
Choreography: Benjamin Millepied
Music: Philip Glass, String Quartet No. 3 (Mishima)
Costumes: Janie Taylor

La Fondation LUMA est très heureuse d’annoncer un nouveau partenariat avec le L.A. Dance Project pour les trois années à venir. Le bâtiment de la Formation, dans le Parc des ateliers, sera dédié à des résidences d’artistes du spectacle vivant et comportera des studios de répétition, des salles de kinésithérapie, des logements et des espaces de vie commune.

Le L.A. Dance Project a pour objectif de créer des œuvres nouvelles et de redonner vie à des créations marquantes de grands chorégraphes, aussi bien sur scène que dans des cadres moins attendus. Les nouvelles œuvres de la compagnie sont issues de collaborations pluridisciplinaires et réunissent des peintres, des plasticiens, des musiciens, des décorateurs, des metteurs en scène et des compositeurs. Depuis sa fondation, la compagnie a fait des tournées et donné des master classes dans des lieux et des festivals de réputation internationale : Holland Festival, festival international d’Edimbourg, la Maison de la Danse, le Saitama Arts Center, le théâtre Sadler’s Wells, les opéras de Shanghai et de Beijing et le théâtre du Châtelet…

Aux États-Unis, elle s’est produite au centre Jacob’s Pillow, à la Brooklyn Academy of Music et au New York City Center. Ses studios se trouvent au Los Angeles Theatre Center, dans le centre de Los Angeles. À L.A., la compagnie a joué dans le Walt Disney Music Hall du Music Center, au MOCA, à la Union Station, au théâtre du Ace Hotel et au Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.

7-13 juillet et 22-24 septembre 2016
La Mécanique générale

Dans ce programme, Benjamin Millepied présente sa chorégraphie Hearts & Arrows, unanimement applaudie, sur une musique de Philip Glass et un concept visuel de Liam Gillick.

Helix
Chorégraphie : Justin Peck
Musique : Esa-Pekka Salonen
Costumes : Janie Taylor

MinEvent
Musique : John Cage
Chorégraphie : Merce Cunningham
Costumes : Banu Ogan
Danseurs : Stephanie Amurao, Anthony Bryant, Aaron Carr, Julia Eichten, Morgan Lugo, Nathan Makolandra, Robbie Moore, Rachelle Rafailedes, Lilja Rúriksdóttir

Hearts & Arrows
Chorégraphie : Benjamin Millepied
Musique : Philip Glass, Quatuor à cordes n°3 Mishima
Costumes : Janie Taylor

Dates
Dates

22, 23, 24 September 2016

22, 23, 24 septembre 2016

Venue
Lieu

La Mécanique Générale

La Mécanique Générale

Frank Gehry: Solaris Chronicles
Frank Gehry: Les Chroniques de Solaris
5 April - 28 September 2014
5 Avril – 28 Septembre 2014

Over the course of six months, Solaris Chronicles examined the creative vision of Frank Gehry through a series of artistic interventions and projects that bridge art and architecture. The exhibition featured large-scale models of Frank Gehry’s seminal projects (including the Loyola Law School and Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Guggenheim Museums in Bilbao and Abu Dhabi), which were situated within a changing mise-en-scene created by artists, presenting an exhibition in constant motion. The large‐scale models, which are the architect’s studio originals, presented a fascinating opportunity to experience Frank Gehry’s transformative contributions to architecture.

These and other artistic gestures were conceived as homages, extensions and revisions. Solaris Chronicles aimed to transform the usual relationship between an architect and artists, offering other possibilities for collaboration between practitioners in the two fields. It also reflected Gehry’s own cross-disciplinary range, and his collaborations with musicians, filmmakers and writers.

With Frank Gehry, John Baldessari, Nicolas Becker and Djengo Hartlap, Pierre Boulez, Liam Gillick, Cai Guo-Qiang, David Lynch, Greg Lynn, Philippe Parreno, Asad Raza, Tino Sehgal.

Curated by Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Philippe Parreno, with the support of the LUMA Arles core group.
Commissioned and produced by the LUMA Foundation for the Parc des Ateliers, Arles.

Les Chroniques de Solaris invitent, autour du travail de Frank Gehry, un groupe d’artistes internationaux à concevoir une mise en scène changeante, dans une exposition en mouvement.
Cette exposition rassemble des maquettes de projets de référence de Frank Gehry, réalisés ou non, sélectionnées par Gehry et Maja Hoffmann. Elle comporte la Loyola Law School et le Walt Disney Concert Hall de Los Angeles, les musées Guggenheim de Bilbao et Abu Dhabi, les Atlantic Yards de Brooklyn, le National Art Museum de Chine et le futur siège de Facebook à Menlo Park dans la Silicon Valley.

Durant six mois, des intervenants issus de la musique, de l’architecture, de la chorégraphie ainsi que des penseurs apporteront leurs contributions. Cette exposition a pour intention de transformer la relation habituelle entre un architecte et des artistes, proposant d’autres formes de collaborations possibles entres les praticiens de ces différents domaines. Elle reflète également toute la transversalité du travail de Frank Gehry ainsi que ses collaborations avec des musiciens, des réalisateurs et des écrivains.

Avec :
Frank Gehry, John Baldessari, Nicolas Becker and Djengo Hartlap, Pierre Boulez, Liam Gillick, Cai Guo Qiang, David Lynch, Greg Lynn, Philippe Parreno, Asad Raza, Tino Sehgal.

Organisé par Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist et Philippe Parreno, avec le soutien du Core Group LUMA Arles.
Commanditée et produite par la Fondation LUMA.

Dates
Dates

5 April - 28 September 2014

5 Avril – 28 Septembre 2014

Venue
Lieu

Atelier de la Mécanique, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Atelier de la Mécanique, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

To the Moon via the Beach
Vers la lune en passant par la plage
5 – 8 July 2012
5 – 8 juillet 2012

“Announcement that work has commenced will be made by three short blasts on an air horn – drawing people to the Amphitheatre. This is an exhibition about work, production and change – ideas in constant motion. A moonscape will be created around which artists will develop new ideas. Everything will be visible – no difference between production, presentation and exchange.”
Liam Gillick and Philippe Parreno, 2012

The LUMA Foundation invited 21 internationally-acclaimed artists to come to Arles to work in its Roman Amphitheatre:

Uri Aran, Daniel Buren, Elvire Bonduelle, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Loretta Fahrenholz, Fischli & Weiss, Jef Geys, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster/Ari Benjamin Meyers/Tristan Bera, Douglas Gordon, Pierre Huyghe, Klara Lidén, Renata Lucas, Benoît Maire, Oscar Murillo, Anri Sala, Pilvi Takala, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Tris Vonna-Michell, Lawrence Weiner.

This important historical site, a major tourist attraction often used for bullfighting and festivals, hosted an exhibition under constant transformation. At the start of the exhibition, visitors encountered an arena covered in tons of sand. Over the course of the exhibition, the terrain was slowly transformed from a beach to a moonscape by a team of world-class sand sculptors led by Wilfred Stijger.

This site under constant motion acted as a backdrop to a series of interventions from the artists who produced works in and around the arena. The project was a pre-cursor to the development of the LUMA Arles campus manifested in the re-use of the sand brought into Arles to create this shifting landscape.

Conceived by Philippe Parreno and Liam Gillick.
Curated by Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno, Beatrix Ruf.
Commissioned and produced by the LUMA Foundation for the Parc des Ateliers in Arles.

« Trois sonneries de corne de brume annoncent le commencement du travail – attirant le public aux Arènes. Il s’agit d’une exposition sur le travail, la production et la transformation – des idées en mouvement perpétuel. Un paysage lunaire se composera progressivement, autour duquel les artistes développeront des idées nouvelles. Tout sera visible, sans distinction entre production, présentation et échange. »
Liam Gillick et Philippe Parreno, 2012.

La Fondation LUMA a invité 21 artistes de réputation internationale à venir à Arles pour travailler sur l’amphi- théâtre romain : Uri Aran, Daniel Buren, Elvire Bonduelle, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Loretta Fahrenholz, Fischli & Weiss, Jef Geys, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster/ Ari Benjamin Meyers/Tristan Bera, Douglas Gordon, Pierre Huyghe, Klara Lidén, Renata Lucas, Benoît Maire, Oscar Murillo, Anri Sala, Pilvi Takala, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Tris Vonna-Michell et Lawrence Weiner.

Cet important site historique, haut- lieu touristique fréquemment utilisé pour des spectacles de tauromachie et des festivals, a accueilli une exposition en transformation constante. Au début de l’exposition, les visiteurs découvraient une arène ensevelie sous plusieurs tonnes de sable. Au fil de l’exposition, le terrain subissait une lente transformation, passant d’une plage à un paysage lunaire grâce à une équipe de sculpteurs sur sable de renommée mondiale, menée par Wilfred Stijger. Ce site en mouvement constant servait de toile de fond à plusieurs interventions d’artistes produisant des oeuvres à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de l’arène. Le projet était un précurseur au développement du campus LUMA Arles qui se manifestait par la réutilisation du sable apporté à Arles pour créer ce paysage changeant.

Conçue par Philippe Parreno et Liam Gillick.
Commissariat : Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno et Beatrix Ruf.
Commanditée et produite par la Fondation LUMA pour le Parc des Ateliers à Arles.

Dates
Dates

5 – 8 July 2012

5 – 8 juillet 2012

Venue
Lieu

Amphitheatre Arles

L’Amphitheatre Arles

More Info
Pour plus d'information
Videos
Videos

More videos on vimeo

More videos on vimeo

Imponderable: The Archives of Tony Oursler
Impondérable : Les Archives de Tony Oursler
6 July - 20 September 2015
6 juillet - 20 septembre 2015

Tony Oursler’s Imponderable is a two-part project: a book and a film that investigate the artist’s extraordinary collection of objects, photography and ephemera relating to the occult, séances, magic, optics, fairies, mesmerism, and many other areas of intrigue. Since the mid-1990s, the artist has developed a number of optical timelines, tracing the development of ephemeral mimetic devices like the camera obscura, the magic lantern, and television; for Oursler, it constitutes a parallel art history. His timeline — which has served as an instrument of inspiration for numerous artworks — was drawn from his interest in overlaps between the histories of science, optics, entertainment, and religion, which ultimately also led him to begin the collection of documents that now form his archives.
Oursler’s fascination with the material is rooted in his own family history: his grandfather, Fulton Oursler, was a famous author, publisher, and friend of magician Harry Houdini and Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes. Fulton took a particular interest in debunking the fraudulent claims of spirit mediums and disproving the so-called evidence (often photographic in nature) that was presented in support of their incredible assertions. While the Imponderable book documents Oursler’s extensive collection of 19th-century spirit photography, thought photography, UFO sightings, stage magic ephemera, and much more, the film follows the journey of Fulton Oursler on his quest to debunk trickery and deception in the early to mid- 20th century.

Commissioned and produced by the LUMA Foundation for the Parc des Ateliers, Arles, France. 

Curated by Tom Eccles (Director, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York) and Beatrix Ruf (Director, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam).

The exhibition was part of the photography festival Les Rencontres d’Arles in 2015. It is on view at the LUMA Westbau in Zurich, Switzerland from 31 October 2015 – 14 February 2016.

Impondérable, de Tony Oursler, est un projet en deux parties : un livre et un film qui explorent son extraordinaire collection personnelle d’objets, de photographies et de documents sur l’occultisme, les séances de spiritisme, la magie, l’optique, les fées, le mesmérisme et de nombreuses autres facettes de l’ésotérisme. Depuis le milieu des années 1990, l’artiste a créé un certain nombre de frises chronologiques visuelles qui retracent le développement d’appareils de reproduction éphémères, tels que la camera obscura, la lanterne magique et la télévision.
Elles forment à ses yeux une histoire de l’art parallèle. Une telle frise chronologique, qui a servi d’inspiration à de nombreuses oeuvres d’art, répondait à son intérêt pour les chevauchements entre l’histoire des sciences, de l’optique, du divertissement et de la religion, qui allait le mener finalement à entreprendre la collection de documents qui constitue aujourd’hui ses archives.
La fascination d’Oursler pour ces domaines s’enracine dans son histoire familiale : son grand-père, Fulton Oursler, était un auteur célèbre et un éditeur ; il était ami avec le magicien Harry Houdini et Arthur Conan Doyle, le créateur de Sherlock Holmes. Fulton prenait un intérêt tout particulier à dénoncer les fraudes des médiums spirites et à démythifier les prétendues preuves (souvent photographiques) qu’ils présentaient pour soutenir leurs incroyables affirmations. Tandis que le livre Impondérable présente la vaste collection d’Oursler en matière de photographie spirite du XIXe siècle, de photographie de la pensée, de vues d’ovnis et de dispositifs de prestidigitation, le film quant à lui suit les traces de Fulton Oursler dans ses tentatives de démythifier illusions et tromperies dans la première moitié du XXe siècle.

L’exposition, commanditée et produite par la Foundation LUMA pour le Parc des Ateliers, faisait partie de l’édition 2015 du festival de photographie Les Rencontres d’Arles.
Elle est présentée au LUMA Westbau à Zurich en Suisse du 31 octobre 2015 au 14 février 2016.
Commissaires: Tom Eccles et Beatrix Ruf.

Dates
Dates

6 July - 20 September 2015

6 juillet - 20 septembre 2015

Venue
Lieu

The Forges, Parc des Ateliers

Les Forges, Parc des Ateliers

Video
Video
The Library is on Fire
La bibliothèque est en feu
Ongoing
En cours

The Library is on Fire follows the adventures of a creature looking for the form of its intelligence. The Swamp Thing lies back in the diagram of Inception. Stéphane Mallarmé discovers the Multiverse. A reading controller is plugged onto the prisms of To the Lighthouse. The Nautilus enters a stream of consciousness. Limbo walks towards the book dreamed by Ludmilla. Thought operations crystallize into glyphs. A new state of library is being pursued

The Library is on Fire is a core element of the forthcoming
LUMA Foundation art and research center

Conceived by Charles Arsene-Henry

1(a) A Creature, 2012, AA, London / Hotel du Cloître, Arles
With Shumon Basar

1(b) Haunted Glyphs, 2013, Le Collateral, Arles
With Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
Featuring Le Rayon Noir by Tristan Bera
Searchers — Alvaro Pulpeiro Fernandez, Cedric Moullier,
Christopher Johnson, Elliot Rogosin

Haunting Glyphs, 2014, Protocinema, Istanbul
With Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

1(x) Phenophor Metamenon, 2014, Le Magasin, Grenoble
In From 199c to 199d by Liam Gillick

1(d) Augmented Readings, 2014, Hotel du Cloître, Arles
Searchers — Buster Rönnngren, Cedric Moullier, Filiz Avunduk,
Jacek Rewinski, Jane Wong, Tristan Bera

1(md2s) Transparent Searchers, 2015, London
With Anton Gorlenko, Buster Rönngren, Cedric Moullier,
Christopher Johnson, Jacek Rewinski, Jane Wong

1(Δ) Prismatic Domains, 2016, La Mécanique, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles
With Poste 9
Searchers – Buster Rönngren, Cedric Moullier, Christopher Johnson, Hunter Doyle, Jacek Rewinski, Jane Wong, Moad Mosbahi, Rory Sherlock

Photographer — Leon Chew

La bibliothèque est en feu suit les aventures d’une créature à la recherche de la forme de son intelligence. Le Swamp Thing s’enfonce dans le diagramme d’Inception. Stéphane Mallarmé découvre le Multivers. Une manette de lecture se branche aux prismes de Vers le Phare. Limbo avance vers le livre dont rêve Ludmilla. Le Nautilus entre dans un courant de conscience. Des opérations de pensée se crystallisent en glyphes. Un nouvel état de bibliothèque est poursuivi

La bibliothèque est en feu est un élément du futur centre de recherche et d’art contemporain LUMA Arles

Conçue par Charles Arsene-Henry

1(a) A Creature, 2012, AA, Londres / Hotel du Cloître, Arles
Avec Shumon Basar

1(b) Haunted Glyphs, 2013, Le Collateral, Arles
Avec Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
Et Le Rayon Noir de Tristan Bera
Chercheurs — Alvaro Pulpeiro Fernandez, Cedric Moullier,
Christopher Johnson, Alvaro Pulpeiro Fernandez, Elliot Rogosin

Haunting Glyphs, 2014, Protocinema, Istanbul
Avec Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

1(x) Phenophor Metamenon, 2014, Le Magasin, Grenoble
Dans From 199c to 199d de Liam Gillick

1(d) Augmented Readings, 2014, Hotel du Cloître, Arles
Chercheurs — Buster Rönngren, Cedric Moullier, Filiz Avunduk,
Jacek Rewinski, Jane Wong, Tristan Bera

1(md2s) Transparent Searchers, 2015, Londres
Avec Anton Gorlenko, Buster Rönngren, Cedric Moullier,
Christopher Johnson, Jacek Rewinski, Jane Wong

1(Δ) Les Domaines Prismatiques, 2016, La Mécanique, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, Arles
Avec Poste 9
Chercheurs – Buster Rönngren, Cedric Moullier, Christopher Johnson, Hunter Doyle, Jacek Rewinski, Jane Wong, Moad Mosbahi, Rory Sherlock

Photographe — Leon Chew

Dates
Dates

Ongoing

En cours

Wolfgang Tillmans: Neue Welt
Wolfgang Tillmans: Neue Welt
1 July - 22 September 2013
1er juillet - 22 septembre 2013

Over 20 years Wolfgang Tillmans has tested and expanded the possibilities of photography in the most varied ways through his photographic and video works. His exhibition New World presents photographs from the artist’s new group of works of the same name, which were created in the course of numerous journeys.

Twenty years after Wolfgang Tillmans first started to form an image of the world, he asks himself whether the world can be seen ‘anew’ in an era characterised by a deluge of media images, and whether a sense of the whole can be formed. Tillmans is not only seeking the ‘new’ in terms of political and economic change, but also in relation to the digital development of photography, which can now enable the presentation of details with a degree of clarity that no longer reflects the capacity of the human eye and vision. Equipped with a digital camera, Tillmans travelled around the world and stayed in each place for just a short time – just long enough to focus intensively on the visible surface of the situation there. Hence, coverings, claddings and façades repeatedly feature in his photographs along with themes from technology and science, such as plants, animals, minerals, material deposits, means of transport and shopping centres.

These prints are combined with the large framed Silver works, which Tillmans has been creating since 1998. The name Silver arises from the dirt traces and silver salt stains that remain on the paper when the artist develops the photographs in a machine that has not been completely cleaned. The visual appearance of the deposits on the photographic paper are determined by an accidental effect produced by the photographic technology which reveals the process of formation and materiality of photography.

An exhibition of Kunsthalle Zürich, organised by Beatrix Ruf, and co-produced by the LUMA Foundation and the Rencontres d’Arles for the 2013 edition.

Depuis 20 ans, Wolfgang Tillmans ne cesse d’interroger et d’étendre les possibilités de la photographie par tous les moyens à travers ses oeuvres photographiques et filmées. Son exposition Monde nouveau présente des photographies extraites de sa nouvelle série éponyme, créée au cours de nombreux voyages.

Vingt ans après que Tillmans a commencé à nous livrer sa vision du monde, il se demande si le monde peut être regardé avec un oeil « neuf » à une époque saturée d’images médiatiques, et s’il est possible de dégager une vue d’ensemble. Tillmans traque le « nouveau » non seulement en termes de changement politique et économique, mais aussi à travers la relation à l’évolution numérique de la photographie, désormais capable de représenter des détails avec un degré de précision sans commune mesure avec l’oeil et la vision humaine. Équipé d’un appareil numérique, Tillmans a fait le tour du monde, ne faisant que de brèves haltes – juste assez longues pour se concentrer sur la surface visible de la situation dans un endroit donné. On retrouve donc à maintes reprises dans ses photographies des toits, des revêtements extérieurs, des façades, ainsi que des thèmes issus de la technologie et de la science (plantes, animaux, minéraux, sédiments, moyens de transports et centres commerciaux).

Ces tirages sont associés aux grandes uvres encadrées de la série Silver, que Tillmans poursuit depuis 1998. Le nom Silver (« gris métallisé ») dérive des traces de saleté et de sel argenté qui restent sur le papier lorsque l’artiste développe les photographies dans une machine qui n’est pas entièrement propre. L’apparence visuelle des dépôts sur le papier photographique découle d’un accident produit par la technologie photographique, qui révèle le processus de formation et la matérialité de la photographie.

Une exposition de la Kunsthalle Zürich, organisée par Beatrix Ruf et coproduite par la Fondation LUMA et les Rencontres d’Arles pour l’édition 2013.

Dates
Dates

1 July - 22 September 2013

1er juillet - 22 septembre 2013

Venue
Lieu

Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

More info
Pour plus d'information
PREV NEXT
programme
Programme
Tom EcclesTom Eccles
Programme
Maja Hoffmann, Liam Gillick, Tom EcclesMaja Hoffmann, Liam Gillick, Tom Eccles
Programme
Zahia RahmaniZahia Rahmani
Programme
Paul O’NeillPaul O’Neill
Programme
Céline Condorelli & Helena ReckittCéline Condorelli & Helena Reckitt
Programme
Programme
Charles EscheCharles Esche
Programme
Programme
Luc BoltanskiLuc Boltanski
Programme
Patrick D. FloresPatrick D. Flores
Programme
Programme
Binna Choi & Annette KraussBinna Choi & Annette Krauss
Programme
Annette KraussAnnette Krauss
Programme
Programme
Jason E. BowmanJason E. Bowman
Programme
Alhena KatsofAlhena Katsof
Programme
Symposium: How Institutions Think
Symposium: Comment pensent les institutions
24 - 27 February 2016
24 - 27 février 2016

This symposium is organized by LUMA Foundation with Paul O’Neill and Tom Eccles (Center for Curatorial Studies, CCS Bard), in partnership with Guus van Engelshoven (de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam); Mick Wilson (Valand Academy of Arts, University of Gothenburg); Charles Esche, Alison Green, and Lucy Steeds (Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London); Simon Sheikh (Department of Art, Goldsmiths, University of London); and Maria Mkrtycheva (the V-A-C Foundation, Moscow).

Speakers will include Luc Boltanski, Mélanie Bouteloup, Jason E. Bowman, Binna Choi, Céline Condorelli, Pip Day, Clémentine Deliss, Keller Easterling, Tom Eccles, Bassam El Baroni, Charles Esche, Arnaud Esquerre, Patrick D. Flores, Alison Green, Marina Gržinić, Alhena Katsof, Annette Krauss, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Paul O’Neill, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Andrea Phillips, Zahia Rahmani, Simon Sheikh, Lucy Steeds, Jeannine Tang, Mick Wilson, and others, with remote choreography by Sarah Pierce.

Contemporary art and curatorial discourse have been centrally concerned with questions of institution. In recent decades, we have seen many debates on institutional critique, new institutionalism, instituent practices, and self-organization. Most often these questions of institution have been apprehended through the categories of power, hegemony, hierarchy, control, value and discipline. Often in these debates, we seem to reach an impasse in contemporary art’s dialectic of institutionalized anti-institutionalism, but nonetheless new institutions of art and enquiry are being conceived, inaugurated and contested in different ways.

This symposium – taking its title from Mary Douglas’s 1986 book, How Institutions Think – addresses the contemporary possibilities and limitations of institutional formats, practices and imaginaries, but starts from a different place, namely from categories of knowledge, cognition and the social. While questions of knowledge have been activated in earlier discussions of the institutions of art, it is much less common for the debate on institutions to be engaged with an emphasis on the social epistemology or cognitive operations of institutional forms and processes. Participants are invited to reconsider the practices, habits, models, revisions and rhetoric of institution and anti-institution in contemporary art and curating by considering themes of epistemic practice, of cognition and social bond, of power/knowledge, and of institution as an object of enquiry across many disciplines including political theory, organizational science and sociology.

Questions we face include: Is institution building anymore possible, feasible or desirable? Are there emergent future institutional models for progressive art and curatorial research practices? How do we construct and legitimate our institutions? How do we know when institutions make decisions and whether these decisions are built upon ethical principles? Can we institute ethical principles and build our institutions accordingly? If so, for whom are we building these future institutions? Are thoughts of institution anywhere different? In what way might institution be multiple? In what ways can we think extra-institutionally, contra-institutionally, an-institutionally, para-institutionally? Is institution the condition of potential thinking and of critique? Wither institution?

The symposium brings together an international and multi-disciplinary group of speakers who are invited to reflect upon how institutional practices inform art, curatorial, educational and research practices as much as they shape the world around us. It also aims to propose new, innovative and emergent forms of institutional practice. Implementing a work-together methodology, combining and sharing networks and knowledge resources, the symposium asks how we may begin to conceptualize and build possible institutions/anti-institutions of the future: What are the models, resources, skills and knowledge-bases required to build a new, innovative and progressive research-led institution, if such a thing is indeed possible?

Through the symposium series we seek to develop a globally networked enquiry into the future of curatorial practice. For this second symposium in the series, we have come together in a period of radical uncertainty and reactive securitizing control to consider how we imagine the dialectic of institution/anti-institution beyond increasingly anachronistic and narrow geopolitical terms.

The symposium is part of an ongoing collaboration between CCS Bard and the LUMA Foundation, which is currently developing a new centre for cultural production in Arles, France. The LUMA project is located in the former railway yards of Arles and includes a major new building designed by Frank Gehry and the renovation of the industrial buildings on the Parc des Ateliers by Selldorf Architects. Previous symposia organized by the LUMA Foundation and Bard College were The Future Curatorial Whatnot Study What, Conundrum (2014) that took place at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College; The Flood of Rights (2013) and The Human Snapshot (2011), both held in Arles.

A follow-up publication will be released in 2017.

Le symposium intitulé « Comment pensent les institutions » est organisé par la Fondation LUMA et Paul O’Neill et Tom Eccles (le Center for Curatorial Studies Bard College) en partenariat avec : Guus van Engelshoven (de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam) ; Mick Wilson (Académie Valand, Université de Göteborg); Charles Esche, Alison Green, et Lucy Steeds (Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, Londres) ; Simon Sheikh (le départment d’art, Goldsmith’s, Université de Londres) ; Maria Mkrtycheva (la Fondation V-A-C de Moscou).

Au nombre des intervenants figureront Luc Boltanski, Mélanie Bouteloup, Jason E. Bowman, Binna Choi, Céline Condorelli, Pip Day, Clémentine Deliss, Keller Easterling, Tom Eccles, Bassam El Baroni, Charles Esche, Arnaud Esquerre, Patrick D. Flores, Alison Green, Marina Gržinić, Alhena Katsof, Annette Krauss, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Paul O’Neill, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Andrea Phillips, Zahia Rahmani, Simon Sheikh, Lucy Steeds, Jeannine Tang, Mick Wilson ; Sarah Pierce proposera une chorégraphie à distance.

Dans l’art contemporain et le discours curatorial, la question de l’institution occupe une place centrale. Les dernières décennies ont vu quantité de débats sur la critique institutionnelle, le néo-institutionalisme, les pratiques instituantes et l’auto-organisation ; ces thèmes ont bien souvent été abordés par le biais de catégories telles que le pouvoir, l’hégémonie, la hiérarchie, le contrôle, les valeurs ou la discipline. Lorsqu’il s’agit d’aborder la dialectique de l’anti-institutionalisme institutionalisé dans l’art contemporain, ces débats paraissent fréquemment aboutir à une impasse. Toutefois, de nouvelles institutions d’art et de recherche continuent d’être conçues, inaugurées et contestées de différentes façons.

Empruntant son titre à l’ouvrage « How Institutions Think » publié par Mary Douglas en 1986 (traduit en français en 1989 puis à nouveau en 1999, éditions Les Découvertes), ce symposium s’interroge sur les possibilités et les limites actuelles des formats, des pratiques et des imaginaires institutionnels, mais en adoptant un autre point de départ, à savoir les catégories du savoir, de la cognition et du social. Si les questions liées au savoir ont déjà été abordées dans de précédentes discussions sur les institutions artistiques, ces débats mettent plus rarement l’accent sur l’épistémologie sociale ou les opérations cognitives propres aux formes et aux processus institutionnels. Les participants seront ainsi invités à réexaminer les pratiques, les habitudes, les modèles, les transformations et les discours autour de l’institution et de l’anti-institution dans le champ curatorial et celui de l’art contemporain en abordant les thèmes de la pratique épistémique, de la cognition et du lien social, du pouvoir et du savoir, et enfin de l’institution comme objet d’étude à travers de nombreuses disciplines, telles la théorie politique, la science de l’organisation, la sociologie…

Le symposium réunit un panel pluridisciplinaire d’intervenants venus du monde entier, qui seront invités à réfléchir sur la façon dont les pratiques institutionnelles façonnent les pratiques artistiques, curatoriales, éducatives et de recherche, tout comme elles modèlent le monde qui nous entoure. Il vise aussi à proposer des formes de pratique institutionnelle inédites et novatrices. Il met en œuvre une méthode de travail collaborative, réunissant et partageant les différents réseaux et ressources afin d’aborder une question centrale : comment commencer à conceptualiser et construire les institutions/anti-institutions du futur ? Quels sont les modèles, les ressources, les talents et les savoirs nécessaires pour bâtir une institution nouvelle et novatrice, vouée à la recherche, si tant est qu’il soit possible de créer une telle institution ?

Notre série de symposiums s’efforce de développer un réseau de réflexion sur l’avenir de la pratique curatoriale au niveau mondial. Cette deuxième édition de la série, qui se tient en un temps d’incertitude dans lequel des problématiques liées au renforcement de contrôle sécuritaire formate un cadre de pensée géopolitique de plus en plus anachronique et étroit: nous tenterons d’en extraire la dialectique Institution/anti-Institution pour ne pas subir ses limites théoriques ».

Le symposium s’inscrit dans le cadre d’une collaboration entre le CCS Bard et la Fondation LUMA qui crée actuellement à Arles un nouveau centre dédié à la production culturelle. Le projet LUMA est installé sur le site d’anciens ateliers de la SNCF ; il comprend la construction d’un bâtiment majeur signé Frank Gehry ainsi que le réaménagement des bâtiments industriels confié à l’agence Selldorf Architects. Les précédents symposiums organisés par la Fondation LUMA et le Bard College s’intitulaient « The Future Curatorial What Not And Study What ? Conundrum » (2014) qui a eu lieu au CCS Bard, « The Flood of Rights » (2013) et « The Human Snapshot » (2011), tous deux à Arles.

Une publication fera suite au colloque, en 2017.

DATES
DATES

24 - 27 February 2016

24 - 27 février 2016

VENUE
LIEU

Les Forges, Parc des Ateliers

Les Forges, Parc des Ateliers

SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE
PROGRAMME DU SYMPOSIUM
VIDEOS
VIDEOS
The Flood of Rights
La Crue des Droits
19 – 21 September 2013
19 - 21 septembre 2013
Symposium
Conférence

People now, almost routinely, make claims for their rights through user-generated communication channels, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr. In images, as well as words and sounds, these claims are proffered and conveyed – we could say, demonstrated – by the self-proclaimed rights bearers themselves, addressed sometimes very directly, sometimes to an undetermined public. These images and their consequences constitute a human rights praxis outside of its conventional sites such as law, government, NGO activity, and formal journalism. They present a radical expansion and consolidation of human rights practices and institutions, and no less a new kind of universalism that underpins and is transformed by these praxes, perhaps constructing a practical communicative ethos that is yet to be understood.

Responding to the drastic changes in how political transformations in the name of justice have been organized and taken place since the first “The Human Snapshot” Conference in Arles in 2011, the second LUMA Foundation Conference in 2013, “The Flood of Rights,” will ask how technologies of image-capture and the channels of communication have in recent years transformed the very terms of human rights. That is, while “The Human Snapshot” explored the possibilities and limitations of the intersections between human rights, photography, and universalism, our focus now turns to the platforms and media of these intersections, and on how the newly produced and disseminated universalizing pressures on morality, law, civic engagement, and their institutions are themselves transfigured in the process.

Our key questions are then:

What are the technologies, languages, institutions, and interests that structure the global distribution of concepts and practices of humanism and universalism, and how do they leave their mark on these ideas themselves?

Which narratives, knowledges, and imageries have proven easier to export and import, and whose interests are at stake in the configurations at hand?

Contributors included Amanda Beech, Rony Brauman, David Campbell, Olivia Custer, Rosalyn Deutsche, Jackson Pollock Bar, Eric Kluitenberg, David Levine, Sohrab Mohebbi, Sharon Sliwinski, Hito Steyerl, and Bernard Stiegler.

Organized by Thomas Keenan, Suhail Malik, and Tirdad Zolghadr in partnership with The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (CCS Bard) and The Human Rights Program (Bard College).

About the Center for Curatorial Studies
The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (CCS Bard) is an exhibition, education, and research center dedicated to the study of art and curatorial practices from the 1960s to the present day.
In addition to the CCS Bard Galleries and Hessel Museum of Art, the Center houses the Marieluise Hessel Collection, as well as an extensive library and curatorial archives that are accessible to the public. The Center’s two-year M.A. program in curatorial studies is specifically designed to deepen students’ understanding of the intellectual and practical tasks of curating contemporary art. Exhibitions are presented year-round in the CCS Bard Galleries and Hessel Museum of Art, providing students with the opportunity to work with world-renowned artists and curators. The exhibition program and the Hessel Collection also serve as the basis for a wide range of public programs and activities exploring art and its role in contemporary society.

About Human Rights Project
The Human Rights Program at Bard College is a transdisciplinary major across the arts, social sciences, and literature. It offers courses that explore fundamental theoretical questions, historical and empirical issues within the disciplines, and practical and legal strategies of human-rights advocacy. Students are encouraged to treat human rights as an intellectual question, challenge human-rights orthodoxies, and think critically about human rights as a discourse rather than merely training for it as a profession. The Human Rights Project links theoretical inquiry and critical explorations of human-rights practice with active research and involvement in contemporary issues. Ongoing initiatives include projects on human-rights forensics (with the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths College, University of London), music and torture, and the intersections between the visual arts and human rights (with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College).

Aujourd’hui, de façon presque routinière, nombre d’individus revendiquent et affirment leurs droits par biais de canaux de communication générés par les utilisateurs, tels que Facebook, Twitter, et Flickr. Par l’image, de même que par les mots et le son, ces revendications sont exprimées et communiquées – ou pourrions-nous dire : démontrées – par les détenteurs de ces droits eux-mêmes, adressées quelques fois de manière très directe, parfois à l’attention d’un public indéterminé. Ces images et leurs conséquences constituent une pratique des droits de l’homme en dehors de ses sites habituels tels que le Droit, le gouvernement, l’activité d’ONG et le journalisme formel. Elles représentent une expansion et une consolidation radicale des pratiques et institutions des droits de l’homme, et rien de moins qu’un nouveau type d’universalisme qui sous-tend et est transformé par ces mêmes pratiques, tout en construisant un éthos de la communication à interroger.

Répondant aux changements majeurs dans la manière dont les transformations politiques, au nom de la justice, ont été organisées et mises en œuvre depuis la première conférence «the Human Snapshot» à Arles en 2011, la seconde conférence LUMA qui s’est tenue en 2013, intitulée «La Crue des Droits», interrogeait la manière dont les technologies de prise d’images et les canaux de communication ont, au cours des dernières années, transformé le terme mêmes de droit de l’homme. En d’autres termes, alors que «The Human Snapshot» explorait les possibilités et les limites des intersections entre les droits de l’homme, la photographie et l’universalisme, notre attention s’était désormais portée sur les plate-formes et les médias de ces intersections et comment les pressions universalistes nouvellement produites et disséminées, affectant la moralité, le droit, l’engagement civique et leurs institutions mêmes sont transfigurées par ce processus.

Les principales questions soulevées furent les suivantes :

Quels sont les intérêts, les technologies, les langues et les institutions qui structurent la distribution globale des concepts et des pratiques liées à l’humanisme et l’universalisme, et comment impactent-ils sur ces idées elles-mêmes ?

Quelles sont les formes de narrations, les connaissances et les images qui se sont révélées plus faciles à exporter et à importer et, qui a des intérêts en jeu dans les configurations en cours ?

Participants : Amanda Beech, RonyBrauman, David Campbell, Olivia Custer, Rosalyn Deutsche, Jackson Pollock Bar, Eric Kluitenberg, David Levine, SohrabMohebbi, Sharon Sliwinski, HitoSteyerl, and Bernard Stiegler.

Organisé par Thomas Keenan, Suhail Malik, et Tirdad Zolghadr en partenariat avec le Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (CCS Bard) et le Human Rights Program (Bard College).

A propos du Center for Curatorial Studies (Centre d’études en conservation)
Le Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College – CCS Bard est un centre d’exposition, d’éducation et de recherche dédié à l’étude des pratiques des arts et de commissariat depuis les années soixante jusqu’à nos jours.
Le Centre abrite non seulement les galeries du CCS Bard et le Hessel Museum of Art, mais également la collection Marie Luise Hessel, ainsi que d’immenses archives livresques et de conservation accessibles au public. Le programme de Master en commissariat d’exposition de deux ans proposé par le Centre permet aux étudiants d’approfondir leur compréhension des tâches intellectuelles et pratiques liées aux activités de commissariat en art contemporain. Les galeries du CCS Bard et le Hessel Museum of Art organisent des expositions toute l’année, fournissant ainsi aux étudiants la possibilité de travailler avec des artistes et des commissaires de réputation mondiale. Le programme d’expositions et la collection Hessel servent également de base à une large gamme de programmes et d’activités publiques explorant l’art et son rôle dans la société contemporaine.

A propos du Human Rights Project (Projet Droits de l’Homme)
Le Human Rights Project du Bard College est un projet majeur transdisciplinaire couvrant les arts, les sciences sociales et la littérature. Il propose des cours qui analysent les sujets théoriques fondamentaux, les questions historiques et empiriques au sein des disciplines, ainsi que des stratégies pratiques et juridiques de plaidoyer pour les droits de l’homme. Les étudiants sont encouragés à aborder les droits de l’homme comme une question intellectuelle, à lancer des débats polémiques sur les orthodoxies des droits de l’homme, et à se lancer dans une pensée critique à propos des droits de l’homme en tant que discours plutôt que de simplement suivre une formation professionnelle dans ce domaine. Le Human Rights Project établit un lien entre l’interrogation théorique et les explorations critiques avec une recherche active et l’implication dans les questions contemporaines. Parmi les initiatives en cours on trouve des projets d’études légales des droits de l’homme (avec le Centre for Research Architecture du Goldsmiths College, University of London), musique et torture, et les intersections entre les arts visuels et les droits de l’homme (avec le Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College).

Dates
Dates

19 – 21 September 2013

19 - 21 septembre 2013

Venue
Lieu

Chapelle du Méjan, Arles

Chapelle du Méjan, Arles

More info
Pour plus d'information
Videos
Videos

More videos on vimeo

ALTERED EARTH: Arles, City of Moving Images
ALTERED EARTH: Arles, ville aux images en mouvement
20 October - 2 December 2012
20 octobre - 2 decembre 2012
Doug Aitken
Doug Aitken

Doug Aitken’s ALTERED EARTH touches some of the core questions of our time in relation to art as well as to our digital age. It comprises distinct but interrelated elements, a contemporary earth-work, an installation of moving images and sound that is site-specific to the topography of the Camargue area around Arles and an iPad application that can be downloaded anywhere, allowing the artwork the potential for ubiquity.

The exhibition opened with a performance by Californian composer Terry Riley. An unprecedented live, one-hour, performance merged experimental music and contemporary art within Aitken’s Altered Earth installation. Terry Riley created an original composition, which was performed live one time only, offering a night of sound and vision.

Since the 1990s, Aitken has brought to video installation the extraordinary possibility for non-linear experience through immersive multi-screen environments. This kind of liquid architecture is used for the video projections in Arles, which feature sequences that are neither wholly documentary nor purely fictional, developed from the characteristics of the local environment. By moving around the origami-like installation and seeing it in different configurations, viewers can construct their own narratives from what they see on the screens.

The app creates new links between these parts, allowing users to move from screen to screen, changing the course of the narrative continuously. Interesting tensions emerge between the representation of a far-away geography and the different layers of fiction in the artwork. With this work, Aitken offers a new notion of the term “site-specific,” reflecting our relation to local and global geography in the digital age and creating a new kind of map.

ALTERED EARTH de Doug Aitken aborde quelques-unes des questions essentielles de notre temps concernant l’art et notre ère numérique. Le projet se compose d’éléments distincts mais interconnectés : une oeuvre contemporaine dans le prolongement de l’Earth art, une installation d’images en mouvement spécifique à un site – la topographie de la Camargue autour de la ville d’Arles, en France – et une application iPad qui peut être téléchargée n’importe où, conférant ainsi à l’oeuvre d’art le don d’ubiquité.

‘La Camargue est un paysage mystérieux et envoûtant, doté d’une beauté brute et d’un caractère unique. Dans cet environnement, les oiseaux migrateurs se réapproprient les bunkers allemands et le Rhône s’élargit jusqu’à la Méditerranée révélant de vastes salines à fleur d’eau. ALTERED EARTH n’est pas un documentaire : c’est un projet qui explore une interprétation kaléidoscopique du paysage moderne…’
–Doug Aitken

Depuis les années 1990, Aitken a apporté à l’installation vidéo cette possibilité extraordinaire qu’est l’expérience non linéaire à travers des environnements immersifs à écrans multiples. Ce genre d’architecture liquide est utilisé pour les projections vidéo dans la région d’Arles, avec des séquences qui ne sont ni totalement documentaires, ni purement fictives, développées à partir des caractéristiques de l’environnement local. En se déplaçant autour de l’installation construite à la manière d’un origami et en l’observant dans différentes configurations, les spectateurs peuvent échafauder leurs propres récits au départ de ce qu’ils voient sur les écrans.

L’appli crée de nouveaux liens entre ces parties, permettant aux utilisateurs de se déplacer d’un écran à l’autre, changeant continuellement le cours du récit. Des tensions intéressantes naissent entre la représentation d’une géographie lointaine et les différentes couches de fiction dans l’oeuvre d’art. A travers ce projet, Aitken propose une nouvelle notion de « spécificité à un lieu », qui reflète notre rapport à la géographie locale et globale à l’ère numérique et qui crée un nouveau genre de carte.

Dates
Dates

20 October - 2 December 2012

20 octobre - 2 decembre 2012

Venue
Lieu

Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

More info
Pour plus d'information
Video
Video
The Human Snapshot
The Human Snapshot
2 - 3 July 2011
2 - 3 julliet 2011
Symposium
Conférence

“The Human Snapshot” was a conference on latter day forms of universalism as circulated and consolidated through contemporary art and photography. Organized by Thomas Keenan & Tirdad Zolghadr, in collaboration with Johanna Burton & Tom Eccles, originally based on a research project by Ariella Azoullay.
While it is commonplace today in academia and politics alike to invoke the claims and norms of human rights, the apparent conceptual underpinnings of this discourse – humanism and universalism – have been subject to radical challenges in recent years. As it happens, one of the major sites of the critique of universalism is critical discourse on the visual arts and the photographic image, which is actually one of the most important operators of what we might call actually-existing universality today. Arguably, it is even that very critique, and the discourse of local and cultural context, which grants contemporary art the luxury and efficiency of an unchecked universalist agenda. Complex presumptions of universal communicability are always already at play in ambitious projects of international scope, and are all the more volatile as a result.
A crucial question here is to which extent the discourses of both contemporary art and human rights are irrevocably linked to a classical universalist foundation. Can the two traditions be unhinged, and what difference would the separation make? Moreover, what role does the image, in all its material manifestations, continue to play within this ideological apparatus?
These and other questions were discussed through a series of lectures and workshops in Arles, beginning with a discussion of the legendary 1955 exhibition Family of Man, drawing on recent research by visual theorist Ariella Azoullay. Other speakers discussed the actual channels of distribution the discourses and images of universalism have at their disposal, but also the class interests at stake in any such distribution, and, finally, the impact of new forms of technology, from the democratization of the camera image to revolutions broadcast online.

FAMILY OF MAN
This panel took the photo exhibition “Family of Man” and its critical legacy as a point of departure. Organized by Edward Steichen at the Museum of Modern Art in 1955, it selected roughly 500 images from nearly 2 million submissions, taken by 273 photographers in almost 70 countries. Among the things which set the 1955 exhibition aside, its forceful universalist agenda stands out. What are present-day pendants of the Family of man, and how might the exhibition’s thematic ground resonate with ongoing debates in contemporary art and human rights.

CHANNELS OF DISTRIBUTION
“The Family of Man” was one of the most widely visited exhibitions ever, and its catalogue is still among the most widely distributed. Moreover, its reception was dramatic and polarized, sparking pedagogical initiatives and polemical “counterexhibitions”. Taking Steichen’s show as a point of departure, what are contemporary sites of exhibition and circulation that facilitate the circulation of ideas ranging from artworld internationalism to the discourse of human rights. Which narratives and imageries have proven easier to export and import, which particular shades of humanist ideology are spawned in the process, and whose interests are at stake in the configurations at hand.

SPECIAL INTERESTS
The European Bourgeoisie famously developed a forceful and still vibrant tradition of framing its interests as being identical to those of humanity in general. On the other hand, the discourses of universalism and human rights have been instrumental in the articulation of struggles of the underprivileged, lending crucial visibility to otherwise marginalized voices. Historically, what special interests have been at stake in the discussion at hand, and how do their generalist claims occasionally turn against them, if they do?

Participants included: Ariella Azoulay, Roger Buergel, Georges Didi-Huberman, Bassam el Baroni, Michel Feher, Hal Foster, Anselm Franke, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Denis Hollier, Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti, Alex Klein, Suhail Malik, Marion von Osten, Katya Sander, Eyal Sivan, Hito Steyerl, Eyal Weizman

This academic symposium was produced by the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, NY, as a first example of possible long-term co-productions between Bard College and the LUMA Foundation. Organized by Tom Keenan and Tirdad Zolghadr in collaboration with Johanna Burton.

La conférence «The Human Snapshot» traita des formes actuelles d’universalisme telles qu’elles sont disséminées et consolidées par le biais de la photographie et de l’art contemporain. Basée à l’origine sur un projet de recherche conduit par Ariella Azoullay, cette conférence a été organisée par Thomas Keenan et Tirdad Zolghadr, en collaboration avec Johanna Burton et Tom Eccles.
Alors qu’il est de bon ton aujourd’hui dans les cercles universitaires et politiques d’invoquer les revendications et normes liées aux droits de l’homme, les fondements conceptuels de ce discours – l’humanisme et l’universalisme – ont été soumis à des défis majeurs au cours des dernières années. L’une des principales critiques de l’universalisme réside dans le discours critique des arts visuels et de l’image photographique, qui représente en fait l’un des opérateurs les plus importants de ce que nous pourrions désigner comme la forme d’universalité qui existe réellement à l’heure actuelle. Cette même critique, et le discours lié au contexte local et culturel, fournissent sans doute à l’art contemporain le luxe et l’efficience d’un agenda universaliste sans contrainte. Des présomptions complexes de communicabilité universelle sont déjà présentes dans des projets ambitieux de portée internationale et en conséquence n’en sont que plus volatiles.
Ici, la question centrale réside dans le fait de savoir dans quelle mesure les discours de l’art contemporain et des droits de l’homme sont irrévocablement liés à la fondation universaliste classique. Est-il possible de mettre un terme à l’articulation entre ces deux traditions et quelle différence résulterait de cette séparation ? D’autre part, quel rôle l’image, et ses manifestations matérielles, continuent-ils à jouer au sein de cet appareil idéologique ?
Ces interrogations et bien d’autres furent discutées au cours de conférences et d’ateliers organisés à Arles, avec comme point de départ une discussion sur la légendaire exposition de 1995, Family of Man. Cette discussion s’inspirait de recherches récentes menées par la théoricienne de l’art visuel Ariella Azoullay. D’autres conférenciers débattirent des canaux actuels de distribution dont disposent les discours et images d’universalisme, ainsi que des intérêts de classe en jeu dans une telle organisation et, pour finir, de l’impact des nouvelles formes de technologie, depuis la démocratisation de l’image photographique jusqu’aux révolutions des diffusions en ligne.

FAMILY OF MAN (La Famille de l’Homme)
Les participants utilisèrent l’exposition photographique «Family of Man» et son héritage critique comme point de départ. Cette exposition, organisée par Edward Steichen au Museum of Modern Art en 1955, représente un corpus d’environ 500 images sélectionnées parmi près de 2 millions de propositions soumises par 273 photographes de près de 70 pays. L’exposition de 1955 fut exceptionnelle de par son agenda universaliste de poids. Quels sont les pendants actuels de Family of Man et comment la base thématique de l’exposition pourrait-elle faire écho aux débats actuels dans le domaine de l’art contemporain et des droits de l’Homme ?

CANAUX DE DISTRIBUTION
«The Family of Man» figure parmi les expositions les plus visitées de l’histoire et son catalogue reste l’un des plus largement distribués. De plus, sa réception fut spectaculaire et polarisée, déclenchant des initiatives pédagogiques et des «contre-expositions» polémiques. En prenant l’exposition de Steichen comme point de départ, quels sont les lieux contemporains d’exposition et de transmission qui facilitent la transmission d’idées allant de l’internationalisme du monde de l’art jusqu’au discours sur les droits de l’homme. Quelles formes de narration et d’images se sont révélées plus faciles à exporter et importer ? Quelles nuances particulières d’idéologie humaniste ce processus engendre-t-il ? Et qui a des intérêts en jeu dans les configurations actuellement en place ?

INTERETS SPECIAUX
La Bourgeoisie Européenne est célèbre pour avoir développé une forte et dynamique tradition de définition de ses intérêts comme étant identiques à ceux de l’humanité en général. D’autre part, les discours d’universalisme et de droits de l’homme ont joué un rôle essentiel dans l’articulation des luttes des plus démunis, fournissant une tribune essentielle à des voix autrement marginalisées. Historiquement, quels intérêts spéciaux ont été en jeu dans ces discussions et dans quelle mesure leurs affirmations généralistes se retournent-elles contre elles, si c’est le cas?

Participants : Ariella Azoulay, Roger Buergel, Georges Didi-Huberman, Bassam el Baroni, Michel Feher, Hal Foster, Anselm Franke, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Denis Hollier, Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti, Alex Klein, Suhail Malik, Marion von Osten, Katya Sander, Eyal Sivan, Hito Steyerl, Eyal Weizman

Ce symposium universitaire a été produit par le Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, NY, comme premier exemple de collaborations de long terme entre le Bard College et la Fondation LUMA. Il a été organisé par Tom Keenan et Tirdad Zolghadr en collaboration avec Johanna Burton.

Dates
Dates

2 - 3 July 2011

2 - 3 julliet 2011

Venue
Lieu

Alyscamps, Arles

Alyscamps, Arles

Videos
Videos

More videos on vimeo

More videos on vimeo

Janet Cardiff - The Forty Part Motet
Janet Cardiff - The Forty Part Motet
6 July – 20 September 2015
6 juillet – 20 septembre 2015

An interpretation of Spem in Alium Nunquam Habui (1573), by Thomas Tallis.

The audio installation The Forty Part Motet (2001) by Janet Cardiff (Canadian artist, born 1957), acclaimed by both public and critics,
was presented in the building known as the Formation, at the Parc des Ateliers, Arles.

This enchanting work comprises a recording of a performance — by a forty-part male voice choir in Salisbury Cathedral — of Spem in Alium Numquam Habui by English composer Thomas Tallis (1505-1585). Their song is broadcast through speakers, elevated the same height as a person and spread in an ellipse within the space. These speakers, and the sound that emanates from them,
invite the public to move around the perimeter of the installation, from one sound source to another, passing from the polyphonic effect of the choir in the centre of the space to hearing individual voices. The public was invited to meditate, reflect and breathe.

Forty Part Motet by Janet Cardiff was originally produced by Field Art Projects with the Arts Council of England, the Salisbury Festival,BALTIC Gateshead, The New Art Gallery Walsall, and the NOW Festival Nottingham. Sung by Salisbury Cathedral Choir. Recording and Postproduction by SoundMoves Edited by George Bures Miller.
Our thanks go to Tate, London (UK) and the Kramlich Collection, San Francisco (USA) for letting us show this work in Arles.

Une interprétation de Spem in Alium Nunquam Habui (1573), de Thomas Tallis

L’installation sonore The Forty Part Motet (2001) de Janet Cardiff (artiste de nationalité canadienne, née en 1957), acclamée par le public et la critique, est présentée dans le bâtiment dit de la Formation, au Parc des Ateliers, à Arles.

Cette oeuvre envoûtante, est composée d’un choeur enregistré de quarante voix masculines de la Chorale de la Cathédrale de Salisbury (Salisbury Cathedral Choir) chantant Spem in Alium
Numquam Habui, du compositeur anglais Thomas Tallis (1505-1585), diffusé à travers autant de haut-parleurs placés à hauteur d’homme sur des trépieds et dispersés dans l’espace d’exposition
comme sur une ellipse. Ces enceintes et le son qui s’en échappe invitent naturellement le public à se déplacer dans le périmètre de l’installation, d’une source sonore à l’autre. Passant de l’effet polyphonique du choeur au centre de l’espace aux voix individuelles au grès de la déambulation dans l’espace. A travers cette polyphonie et ces voix singulières, le public est convié à une émouvante méditation, réflexion, respiration.

Forty Part Motet de Janet Cardiff fut initialement produite par Field Art Projects avec le soutien de Arts Council of England, Canada House, le Salisbury Festival, Salisbury Cathedral Choir, BALTIC Gateshead, The New Art Gallery Walsall, et le NOW Festival Nottingham.
Chant: Salisbury Cathedral Choir; Enregistrement et postproduction: SoundMoves; Edité par: George Bures Miller;
Produit par: Field Art Projects
Nous remercions la Tate, Londres (Grande Bretagne) et la Collection Kramlich, San Francisco (Etats-Unis) de nous permettre de présenter cette oeuvre à Arles.

Dates
Dates

6 July – 20 September 2015

6 juillet – 20 septembre 2015

Venue
Lieu

La Formation, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

La Formation, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Liam Gillick, All-Imitate-Act
Liam Gillick, All-Imitate-Act
6 July - 20 September 2015
6 juillet - 20 septembre 2015

Alongside the Atelier de la Mécanique stand enormous, hollowed out panels. Place your head through any of them and you’ll be projected into Oskar Schlemmer or Kasimir Malevich’s body or even immortalised as a Bauhaus dancer or as a character from “Victory Over The Sun”. These panels recreate the abstract profiles of various costumes, outfits and characters created by artists in the period 1910 to 1940.

The English artist Liam Gillick who lives and works in New York,creates a public work that redefines itself through the use that visitors to the Parc des Ateliers find in it and the interaction and exchanges that it creates. His work questions the format of exhibitions.

Produced for the Holland Festival in collaboration with the Stedelijk Museum, this work will be presented until September 2015.
Commissioned by Holland Festival and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy of Esther Schipper, Berlin.
Presented by the LUMA Foundation at the Parc des Ateliers in Arles, France.

Sur l’esplanade du Parc des Ateliers se dressent de grands panneaux qui sont évidés par endroit. Passez la tête dans chacun d’eux et vous serez projeté dans le corps d’Oskar Schlemmer ou Kasimir Malevich, ou bien immortalisé en danseur Bauhaus ou en personnage de «Victoire sur le Soleil».

L’artiste anglais Liam Gillick qui vit et travaille à New York, crée ici une oeuvre publique qui se redéfinit au grès de l’usage que le visiteur du Parc des Ateliers peut en faire et de l’interaction et des échanges qu’elle provoque. Son travail questionne jusqu’au format même de l’exposition.

Produite par le Holland Festival en collaboration avec le Musée Stedelijk, cette oeuvre intitulée « All-Imitate-Act » sera présentée jusqu’en septembre 2015.
Concept : Liam Gillick. Coproduction : Holland Festival, Stedelijk Museum d’Amsterdam. Avec l’aimable autorisation d’Esther Schipper, Berlin.
Présenté par la Fondation LUMA au Parc des Ateliers d’Arles en France.

Dates
Dates

6 July - 20 September 2015

6 juillet - 20 septembre 2015

Venue
Lieu

Esplanade, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Esplanade, Parc des Ateliers, Arles

Back to top
Retour en haut de page
NEWSLETTER
NEWSLETTER

Thank you for joining the LUMA Arles mailing list. Please complete your sign-up by filling out the fields below.
Fields marked with (*) are required.

Merci d’avoir rejoint la liste de diffusion de LUMA Arles. Nous vous invitons à finaliser votre inscription en remplissant les champs ci-dessous. Les champs qui comprennent une (*) sont obligatoires

Name*
Nom*
Please add a name
Veuillez indiquer votre nom
Email*
Email*
Please enter a valid email address
Veuillez indiquer votre adresse mail
Country*
Pays*
Please add a country
Veuillez indiquer votre pays